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April 27, 2017

Would YOU link your identity with something that goes against your deeply held beliefs?

Kim Davis Despite what one thinks of Davis, her appearance, her manner, or her position, this case has the ability to produce ripple effects in the way people’s religious faith is or is not tolerated in America’s public and government arenas.

One of the points that is not being brought up in the Davis story – in many communities, the NAME of the court clerk (whether or not he or she has personally participated in the processing of documents) appears on the paperwork the office processes.

For instance, in some communities when you get your auto registration tags, they come from the clerk’s office with the clerk’s name on the return address and on the document stapled to your tags. In the case of Davis, if her office were to provide marriage licenses to same gender pairs, even if she is not personally processing the paperwork, it may be that her own name will be affixed to the documents.

This may be more than she is willing to bear – having her own identity linked to something she vehemently disagrees with.

This is may be more than just “do your job” – this may be “willingly have your name visibly linked to what your faith finds abhorrent.”

Some are having sport with her personal history of failed marriages and others even go so far as to poke fun at her appearance. I am not sure when she came to faith, before or after her marriage problems, and in the end even that does not matter. She has the courage of her conviction and is demonstrating that she is willing to pay a penalty for it – something sorely lacking in American culture today.

Some say she is trying to become a celebrity and will make a run on the FOX circuit. If that’s the case, then God will see that and she will receive her rewards accordingly. Others say her actions are rooted not in faith’s convictions or religious liberty, but instead come from a place of hatred. Again, if that’s the case, God will see that and she will receive her rewards accordingly.

I have read some say that “she should have seen this coming.” I disagree with that a bit, as only five of the Supreme Court judges sided with the same gender marriage idea. This decision was not the result of the thoughts of some overwhelming majority of judges, or of Americans, regardless of how some wish to portray it. The nation was – and still is – decidedly divided on the idea and we should not be at all surprised that some people are finding it hard to accept the Supreme Court’s decision.

As we watch this case unfold, we need remember that we do not know the woman’s head or heart – we’re basing our conclusions from reports of the ever-not-so-reliable media. Despite what one thinks of Davis, her appearance, her manner, or her position, this case has the ability to produce ripple effects in the way people’s religious faith is or is not tolerated in America’s public and government arenas. It should be watched closely with intelligence, wisdom, and above all, prayer.

I wish I wrote this, but it comes from a wise friend who is a business leader and pastor. Shared with his permission.


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4 Comments on Would YOU link your identity with something that goes against your deeply held beliefs?

  1. Thought provoking topic for sure. I cannot speak for Ms. Davis nor do I know her background,etc. I do know that I believe in my heart as a Christian that God says in His word that homosexuality is a sin. I know that just like infidelity, and premarital sex, they are all sins and He will judge all sin. Lies,stealing,etc. I know we should hate the sin and yet show a love like Jesus. Maybe if we do, others will come to know Christ.(that is my prayer)
    Finally,I must say that I am saddened as I see our country becoming more and more willing to accept these sins as “normal” . whatever happened to one nation under God?

    • I like that u mentioned the other areas that hurt individuals and society- lying, stealing, adultery and more. We do ourselves, others and God a great disservice when we make one sin a mountain to die on, but we’re willing to overlook “pet sins” so many of us struggle with – selfishness, gossip, lack of compassion, etc.

      I respect Davis’ beliefs, but I think she’s gone about this in the wrong way by making taxpayers bear the burden of her actions with the legal expenses she’s racked up for her community. Unfortunately, that’s done more to distance people from faith than draw people to it.

      What’s the right way to handle this? I have no idea, but I know the fight, either in support of or against Davis’ position, should not involve taxpayers’ money.

  2. Hi, Kim. I’m Mauro, from Argentina.
    In the first place, I’m a heterosexual person and I’ll talk from that place.
    Willing to make my point clear: If we don’t know that woman’s head we neither know homesexual people heads o hearts; that’s why I think that judging them for their choices is as absurd as judging her. I think what she made was not defending her beliefs, but just a refusal to obey a law she thought is wrong, above all because it was not her decision to make that marriage legal. She is just a clerk and, for me, her behavior has the same value that the one of a person that refuses to eat because the day is not shiny. I see no link there.

    In that order of things, another thought I’ve had is that everyone is linked with everything in the sense that, we censor o approve it, like it or not, make it a difficult or an easy way to go, we are related. And, now, she’s releated to homosexual people issue in a way or another. It’s seems a change in the point of view, but i see as the same thing I want to express.

    For closing, I give my opinion as an Argentina citizen for two reasons: 1) the same debate has happened in my country some years ago, and: 2) I think that the laws and rules for a civilised coexistence are some and the same everywhere and we are making an joint effort to clarify them with these debates.

    Thanks, and a warm salute.
    Mauro Baggiani

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